1. Step

The visible tracing on the ice that is executed on one foot. It may consist of an edge or a turn such as a three or counter.

2. Open Stroke

A step started close behind the skating foot without crossing in front or behind. It should be noted that on all forward edges the free leg is held behind before coming to the skating foot for the next step. On all backward edges the free leg is held forward before returning to the skating foot for the next step.

3. Cross Stroke

A step started with the feet crossed so that the impetus or power is gained from the outside edge of the foot that is becoming the free foot. Note – the legs cross above the knees.

4. Crossed Step Forward

A step in which the free foot is placed on the ice on the outer edge side of the skating foot with the free leg crossed in front of the skating leg. Note – the legs cross below the knees.

5. Crossed Step Behind

A step in which the free foot is place on the ice on the outer edge side of the skating foot with the free leg crossed behind the skating leg. Note – the legs cross below the knees.

6. Chasse

A step combination during which the free foot is placed beside the skating foot, but not ahead of it, with the new free foot leaving the ice beside the new skating foot.

  • Crossed Chasse – A chasse in which the free foot is placed on the ice crossed behind the skating foot when skating forward or crossed in front when skating backward.
  • Slide Chasse – A chasse in which the free foot slides off the ice in front when the skater is skating forward and behind when the skater is skating backward

7. Progressive (Run)

A step or sequence of steps in which the free foot passes the skating foot before it is place on the ice, thereby bringing the new free foot off the ice trailing the new skating foot.

8. Roll

A short or long, forward or backward edge, which curves in the opposite direction to the preceding edge thus creating the rolling movement that gives the step its name.

  • Swing Roll – A roll held for several beats of music during which, when skating backward, the free leg first swings forward, then backward to the skating foot to be placed on the ice beside the skating foot. (When skating forward, the free leg first swings backward, then forward.)
  • Cross Roll – A roll started forward with the feet crossed in front or backward with the feet crossed behind. The impetus is gained from the outside edge of the skating foot as it become the free foot.

9. Slip Step

A step skated in a straight line with the blades of both skates being held flat on the ice. The weight is over the skating leg which has a well bend knee while the free foot slides forward on the ice to full extension.

10. Toe Step

A step where the skater steps from one to the other without jumping.

11. Turn

A rotational movement in which the skater moves from forward to backward or backward to forward

  • Three – A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an inside edge or an inside edge to an outside edge, with the exit curve continuing on the same lobe as the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction of the curve.
  • Dropped Three – A three turn in which the weight is almost immediately transferred (“dropped”) to the free foot as it becomes the skating foot for the next step.
  • Quick Dropped Three – A rotational movement performed so rapidly that it takes place almost on the same spot or within one beat of music. The Turn is made from a forward outside three to the backward outside edge of the opposite foot, then the skater immediately steps forward onto the original foot. Such a sequence may be skated with forward or backward, inside or outside three turns.
  • Waltz Three – A three turn skated with the free leg extended close to the ice, and the tow and hip well turned out and held over the tracing. The instep of the free foot is then drawn close to the heel of the skating foot as the turn is made. After the turn the free foot is extended and held ahead of the tracing before being brought back beside the skating foot in time for the next step.
  • Bracket – A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an inside edge or an inside edge to an outside edge, with the exit curve continuing on the same lobe as the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction opposite the curve.
  • Rocker – A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an outside edge or an inside edge to an inside edge, with the exit curve on a different lobe from the entry curve. The skater turns in the direction of the entry curve.
  • Counter – A turn executed on one foot from an outside edge to an outside edge or an inside edge to an inside edge, with the exit curve on a different lobe from the entry curve. The skater turns in the opposite direction of the entry curve (i.e. in the direction of the exit curve).
  • Swing Rocker or Counter – A type of rocker or counter in which the free foot swings smoothly past close to the skating foot before the turn and after the turn is either moved past the skating foot and held behind over the tracing or allowed to swing forward.

12. Mohawk

A turn from one foot to the other in which the entry and exit curves are continuous and of equal depth. The change of foot is from an outside edge to an outside edge or from an inside edge to an inside edge.

  • Open Mohawk – A mohawk in which the heel of the free foot is placed on the ice at the inner side of the skating foot, the angle between the two feet behind optional. Following the weight transfer, the immediate position of the new free foot is behind the heel of the new skating foot.
  • Closed Mohawk – A mohawk in which the instep of the free foot is held at the heel of the skating foot until the free foot is placed on the ice behind the heel of the skating foot. Following the weight transfer, the immediate position of the new free foot is in front of the new skating foot.
  • Swing Mohawk – An open or closed mohawk in which the free leg swings forward closely past the skating leg and then back to the skating foot to execute the turn.

13. Choctaw

A turn from one foot to the other in which the curve of the exit edge is opposite to that of the entry edge. The change of foot is from outside edge to inside edge or inside edge to outside edge. Unless otherwise specified in the dance description, the free foot is placed on the ice close to the skating foot. The entry and exit edge are of equal depth.

  • Open Choctaw – A choctaw in which the free foot is placed on the ice at the inner side of the skating foot. Following the weight transfer the immediate position of the new free foot is behind the heel of the new skating foot.
  • Closed Choctaw – A choctaw in which the instep of the free foot is held at the heel of the skating foot until the free foot is placed on the ice behind the heel of the skating foot. Following the weight transfer the immediate position of the new free foot is in front of the new skating foot.
  • Swing Choctaw – An open or closed choctaw in which the free leg swings forward closely past the skating leg and then back to the skating foot to execute the turn.
  • Cross Open Choctaw – A choctaw in which the outside of the free foot is held in front of and at right angles to the skating foot. This hip is open after the turn. It may be wide-stepped.

14. Rotational Movements

  • Twizzle – A traveling turn on one foot with one or more rotations which is quickly executed. The turn may rotate in either a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. The weight remains on the skating foot with the free foot close beside it ready to skate the exit edge which is stepped closely beside the skating foot. This turn is skated separately by one or both partners. A series of three turns is not acceptable as this does not constitute a single action.
  • Series of Synchronized Twizzles – at least two twizzles for each partner with up to 3 small steps between. Each twizzle shall be at least one rotation on one foot performed simultaneously by both partners. Examples:
      • side by side in the same direction (matching)
      • side by side in opposite direction (mirror)
      • following one another (one skating forward and/or backward and the other skating forward and/or backward)
  • Pirouette – A spinning movement performed on one foot on the spot by one or both partners, with or without the assistance of the other partner.
  • Dance Spin – A spin skated by the couple together in known dance hold or variation thereof (except hand in hand). It should be performed on the spot around a common axis with only one foot of each partner remaining on the ice throughout. Change(s) of foot for both partners may be permitted.

15. Leg and Foot Positions

  • Coupee – A movement in which the free foot is held up in contact with the skating leg from an open hip position so that the free foot is at a right angle to the leg of the skating foot.
  • Passe – A movement in which the free foot is held up to the side of the skating leg from a closed hip position so that the free foot is parallel to the leg of the skating foot.
  • Attitude – The free leg is bend and brought up out and behind at a ninety degree angle to the leg of the skating foot.

16. Dance Lifts

  • Dance Lift – An action in which the partner is elevated to any height and set down. During the action, the lifting partner must not raise the hands higher than the head. Any rotations and/or positions and changes of the same during the lift are permitted except sitting or lying on the partner’s shoulder or back. Lifts should enhance the music chosen and express its character, but not be a display of acrobatics. Acrobatic lifts are defined as moves in which the partner is held by the blade(s), foot (feet), leg(s) or arm(s) and swung around. These or other such actions which display sheer feats of strength are not permitted.
  • Rotational Lift – A lift in which the lifting partner rotates (the lifted partner may be stationary or mobile during this rotation).
  • Multiple Curve – A lift in which the lifting partner moves through at least two different curves.  The change of direction may incorporate a three turn, rocker, mohawk, or similar turn (of not more than 1/2 rotation), but a turn is optional.
  • Combination – A lift that includes at least two of the above types.  Each lift type being given approximately equal emphasis.

17. Dance Jumps

  • Jump – One partner at a time may execute a jump of not more than one revolution either holding hands or separated. Such jumps must not be thrown or lifted.
  • Dance Jump – A small jump not more than 1/2 revolution used to change foot or direction. Such jumps must be executed in dance position or at not more than 2 arms-length apart. Both partners may jump at the same time.
  • Hops – A small jump without revolution.